Micromanagers are anything but leaders

Companies who place their trust in someone whose management style requires them to be solely reliant on his or her directives to survive are walking on thin ice.

Well-formed companies whether non-profit or for-profit have leaders who delegate and don’t proceed to meddle every step of the way.  Micromanagers strangle a company’s ability to flourish. What flourishing a company does appear to be doing while in the grip of a micromanager is usually a façade, nothing more than a house of cards that sooner or later will come tumbling down.

As the inaccurate perception that the company cannot exist without the micromanager grows, the company’s presence in the community will become increasingly dysfunctional and ineffective and the company workplace, increasingly toxic. The underlying reasons for people becoming micromanagers are fairly straightforward. They are usually insecure individuals who, without feeling in complete control of everything,  feel completely out of control, and that can be scary. However, there is a underlying danger when employees are cast in the role of taking care of and catering to the micromanager; the purpose of the company gets cast aside.

Micromanagers are ultimately a destructive force in any company setting, but, from where I sit, they are particularly destructive when the company or agency they are involved with has the task of advocating for and providing services to people with disabilities, people, like me, with brain injuries.

The personal insecurities a micromanager grapples with cannot and does not take precedence over the people the company is there to serve.

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