Scared Straight for NRA leaders

There needs to be a Scared Straight Program for the NRA’s leadership.  It’d  be a real-deal Scared Straight Program, if I were its author, I can tell you. Wayne LaPierre and Dana Loesch would have to buckle up.

Scared Straight! was a 1978 documentary about a group of juvenile delinquents who come face-to-face, for three hours, with  a few  lifers incarcerated at New Jersey’s Rahway State Prison. The lifers jumped ugly with the boys, yelling at them, ridiculing them, telling them in expletive-laced language all about the brutalities of prison life.  Confronted like this, it was hoped the boys would chose a healthier path in life as opposed to their current path, one born to put them in prison, get them killed, or both.

My Scared Straight for the NRA leaders

Every time there is a mass shooting they will be escorted to the scene as quickly as possible. If the scene is not secure, they’ll remain for that experience. Once the scene is secure, the next step in the program takes place. NRA leaders will be escorted by first responders to see the uncovered bodies of those killed. NRA leaders will be asked to look directly at the bodies. If there are wounded, they will assist first responders, following only their directives to the letter.

It will not be easy.

Look! There, on the floor, the woman, her torn-up torso, blown clean-through with bullets. You can’t see her face behind the dark red, her twisted shape, wet with blood, and being. And there, right next to her, a boy child’s dead body, bullet holes, a dislocated mess.  The floor beneath you leaves when you realize the woman had been holding the child in her arms to protect him while the bullets ended them both.

LaPierre and  Loesch should be the first to enroll in the Scared Straight Program for the NRA Leadership.

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NRA putting Pence’s life in danger?

For reasons not fully understood,  the National Rifle Association has decided to place Vice President Mike Pence’s life in jeopardy by issuing a ban on guns at Pence’s Friday night speech to the National Rifle Association conference in Dallas. Or, for the first time in its history, the NRA is admitting the presence of guns increases the presence of life-threatening danger.

NRA executive director and CEO Wayne LaPierre was vehement in his assertion that giving guns to “armed security” in schools would make the schools safer.

“The whole idea from some of our opponents, that armed security makes schools less safe, is completely ridiculous,” LaPierre said, during February’s Conservative Political Action Conference.

Surely Lapierre would take the moral high ground when it comes to keeping children safe. If true, then the ban on guns is knowingly putting Pence in danger. Or, LaPierre and his crew don’t give a damn about keeping children safe.

I don’t think LaPierre and the NRA leadership give a damn about school safety.

 

 

 

NRA admits to country’s gun problem

By proposing a program of armed guards for the nation’s schools, the National Rifle Association’s executive vice-president Wayne LaPierre today acknowledged there is a problem with the proliferation of guns in today’s society. After all, you can’t proclaim a need for armed guards in the nation’s schools and deny there’s a gun problem in the same breath.

In proposing the National School Shield Program, LaPierre, who would not take questions from the press, said, “The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.”

Not surprisingly, LaPierre did not address how easy it is for the “bad guys” to get guns. He uttered not a syllable about the country’s lax gun law’s nor did he say a word about the gun show loophole, itself a major resource for the “bad guys” when it comes to buying weaponry. There are an estimated  5,000 gun shows a year; in 33 states private gun owners can sell guns and buyers are not required to undergo federal background checks.

Now why, given that gun shows are an easy way for the “bad guys” to get guns, did LaPierre not say anything? Because, for the NRA leadership (and the gun manufacturers they worship), access to guns for anyone and everyone, “good guy” or “bad guy,” is more important than the safety of our citizens, including our most precious citizens, our children.

How LaPierre remained straight-faced when he said, “The truth is that our society is populated by an unknown number of genuine monsters, people that are so deranged, so evil, so possessed by voices and driven by demons that no sane person can ever possibly comprehend them,” while at the same time knowing the NRA is perhaps the leading perpetrator in blocking any reasonable effort to make it harder for the so-called evil people to get guns is beyond me.

Bill Moyer’s was right when he said, “The NRA is a killer instinct’s best friend.” Let’s not forget that the NRA opposed a bill that sought to block the sale of Teflon (cop-killing) piercing bullets to the general public.

There is no question a tapestry response is needed to address the underlying causes (violent video games and movies) for mass murders like the one in Newtown, Connecticut. But to do so without addressing the need for responsible gun control measures is like trying to address the challenge of lung cancer without addressing (or mentioning) smoking.

The NRA does not seem to care about facts, only posturing, and any excuse under the sun to add more guns to an already gun-drenched society.

If our leaders show a tenth of the courage the staff of the Sandy Hook Elementary School did in protecting the children with their lives, then perhaps responsible gun control measures, like a real assault weapons ban, closing the gun show loophole, and limiting the number of rounds a magazine can hold, to name three, might come to pass. If not, there will be many more Newtowns.